Fact List General Knowledge History

10 Biggest Mistakes in History

Comments (3)
  1. Valannin says:

    The Islamic world had the best scientists in the 13th century? Roger Bacon, Albertus Magnus, Fibonacci, Pierre de Maricourt? The best artists? Name three. The largest cities? In the 13th Century, the largest cities were in China, (specifically Hangzhou and Nanjing) and Southeast Asia (specficially Angkor) not the “Islamic World”. And as for being ‘tolerant of other cultures,’ from the 7th through the 12th Centuries, the ‘tolerant’ Muslims conquered Cyprus, Sicily, Southern Italy, Septimania, Georgia, Crete and the entire Iberian peninsula.

    A facts site should contain facts, not aplogetics.

  2. Bob says:

    The guy that killed the tree openly admitted to him using his core bit in the tree but it was such a big (old) tree it did break.. inside the tree. The only way to get it out was sack the tree. Hey, there were probably older ones, right? So he takes a slice of it and brings it home. That night he’s counting the rings and like “Holy sh*t. What have I done.”

  3. You missed a couple goodies says:

    There was this one plane crash that was like 9/11 meets Titanic.

    It was a normal day at Tenerife North Airport, then Los Rodeos Airport. Someone’s actual bomb blew up at a different airport, so planes were diverted to this one. Among the relocated flights were a KLM plane (it was an airline) and a Pan-Am one (it went out of business after 9/11). The two planes had contradicting orders, flying from both sides of the same runway. Obviously one would start and fly past the second one as it started. But there was a thick fog so the planes couldn’t see eachother. Also, the airport didn’t have radar yet. After many delays both pilots were ready to go and didn’t want to wait anymore. They both started down the runway. The two planes going at top speeds toward eachother hit nose-first, killing 583 and injuring 61 remaining passengers.

    Testing involving Thiokol for rocket materials found it wouldn’t work in cold temperatures. The materials were used in space shuttles and they told the NASA administrators this. The admins didn’t want to wait a month or two more, and treated it like it was nothing. The products had very little certainty but the admins couldn’t wait to get the shuttle off the pad. So on January 28, 1986 Space shuttle Challenger was brought out to be launched, and mission STS-51L went underway. 72 seconds into flight the solid rocket boosters malfunctioned and with the tank of explosive fuels next to the exploding rockets, the whole shuttle was compromised. The cockpit didn’t break, and the crew didn’t know that their rocket was no more. They thought they could glide to safety but after climbing up to their peak of their trajectory, they began the fall back to earth, conscious of everything. They met their demise and caused many astronauts to strike.

    Dr. Thomas Midgley Jr. was a fun man. Not really, he was a well-intentioned chemist responsible for a few goodies;

    CFC’s were an amazing substance. They were nontoxic, nonflammable and easily mass-produced. They were used in everything from fridges to hairspray. Until it was found out they were depleting the ozone layer. After decades of tariffs and bans, the ozone is slowly starting to come back. But wait, there’s more.

    The same man also was hired by General Motors to find a way to make engines run smoother. He found lead to work well in the gasoline. Yes, he invented leaded gas. Lead is a nasty substance, killing brain cells and creating birth defects as well as mood swings and antisocial personality disorder. For decades cars spewed lead into the air, making crime rates higher and swinging the age scientists thought the planet was. It wasn’t till some plucky young geologist took some ice core samples in Antarctica found how bad this all was. After much suppression the gas companies’ greed finally became realized in court and now leaded gas is a thing of the past.

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