General Knowledge Listicles

10 Fun Facts About September

September: the month when you feel the first cool breeze followed by an iconic transition into fall. This month may lack major holidays, but it’s still packed with interesting facts that most people don’t know about. Plus, you’d be surprised to find out that there are some fun holidays scattered throughout the ninth month of the year. Read on to learn 10 fun facts about the month of September!

1. The Word September Comes From The Roman Calendar

The name “September” comes from an old Roman word, “septem,” which actually means 7. Isn’t September the 9th month of the year? Yes, that’s right, when we’re referring to the modern-day US calendar year. In the Roman calendar, at the time the term was coined, it was the 7th month.

2. September Is The Month Of Fire

Another interesting fact about the Romans: They believed that September was looked after by the god of fire. So they always expected fires and volcanic eruptions to occur during this month.

3. The Month With The Most Letters

Out of all 12 months of the year, September is spelled with the most letters. It contains nine letters, and it happens to be the ninth month of the year. No other months have the same amount of letters as their number in the calendar year.

4. September’s Birthstone Is Sapphire

The birthstone for September is the sapphire, which is found in many different colors but is most well known for being a bright, vivid blue color. The sapphire is known for representing wisdom, good fortune, truth, and power.

5. First Day Of Fall Comes In September

The first day of fall is typically on September 22 or September 23 in North America. This is when the hours in the day are almost equal to the hours in the night. It’s the second equinox of the year, followed by the first equinox that takes place in March. Most people look at the first day of fall as the official end of the summer.

6. Constitution Day, The Forgotten Holiday, Falls In September

September has a little-known holiday that carries significant meaning to it. September 17th is observed as Constitution Day, which marks the day that the U.S. Constitution was adopted.

7. There Are Plenty Of Popular Tunes With “September” In The Title

Over 10 songs have “September” in the title. Songs like “Wake me up when September ends,” by Greenday as well as “September of my years” by Frank Sinatra are all part of this list.

8. Little-known Holidays In September

September may not have any major U.S. holidays, unlike the months that follow it with Halloween, Thanksgiving, and Christmas; however, it does have a few fun, little-known holidays. Among these are National Grandparent Day, National Cheese Pizza Day, and National Drink-a-Beer Day.

9. September Is Known As Harvest Month

As the weather begins to cool, it takes longer for vegetable crops to harvest in September. Since the weather isn’t frigid yet but it is beginning to cool, especially in Northern regions, vegetables can be planted in September as long as they are cared for properly. It’s a great month to harvest in preparation for the coming winter months. In fact, in Old England, it was called Haervest-monath, meaning Harvest Month. Some of the best crops to harvest are onions, apples, raspberries, and tomatoes.

10. September Zodiac Signs

Zodiac signs in September are split between Virgo (August 23 – September 22) and Libra (September 23 – October 22). Virgos are known for being loyal and practical. They are typically thoughtful, analytical people who sometimes come off as cold, but it’s only because they’re taking a methodical approach to friendship (like most aspects of their lives). Libras are a little different, whose main characteristics include being diplomatic and fair. They like harmony, hate being alone, and always strive for peace and justice in the world.

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  • “modern-day US calendar year”. Excuse me, but the US wasn’t even a colony when we started using the current gregorian calendar in 1582.

    The rest of the article is merely a rephrase of the page where the first link leads to.

  • So, I made a comment here last week and it didn’t get placed. Considering it was more fact-based than the article, I can only assume you are unable to handle criticism.

    Rather sad isn’t it? I mean, to ignore or leave out certain parts you don’t LIKE (while being truthful) is pretty much the way to lose a realistic perspective. And the faith of any readers here.

    I’m not saying you should post negative comments (they tend to do more harm than resolve), but you could have at least read the source of the article and have it changed or removed it.

    Wait, let’s go ask the original author what he/she thinks. Probably not liking the content-spin there. I’ll let you know.

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